Tag Archives: Mandarin

Jung-chi Chang – Gong fan AKA Partners in Crime (2014)

Huang, Lin, and Yeh find a dying classmate in an alley and try to find out what brought her to that point. Read More »

Ann Hui – Tin shui wai dik ye yu mo AKA Night and Fog (2009)

Russell Edwards at Variety:
Domestic violence gets a compelling once-over in Hong Kong vet Ann Hui’s “Night and Fog,” which rises above its low-budget limitations on the basis of its hot-button topic and stellar performances. Establishing an air of fatalism at the start, this is a distinctly grim companion piece to Hui’s 2008 pic, “The Way We Are,” which offered a more benign portrait of the same Hong Kong town. Hui’s home fanbase should ensure respectable B.O. upon release in May for a subject many would like swept under the carpet. Further afield, the pic will become a fixture of quality fest programs. Read More »

Tun Fei Mou – The End of the Track (1970)

Quote:
Tong and Yong-sheng are inseparable playmates, but after Yong-sheng dies in an accident, Tong falls into a dark spiral. At the time, this film was banned due to its homosexual overtones and ideology, while some felt that certain segments drew comparison with CHEN Ying-zhen’s short story The Noodle Stall. Read More »

Yuen Chor – Wu yi AKA Sex, Love, and Hate (1974)

Accredited director of erotica and kung-fu films Chu Yuan, combines stars from both genres in Sex, Love And Hate, a masterpiece about Hong Kong society’s differing emotional views on love and what women want when it comes to happiness in love. The provocative Ching Li (Chu Tai), the exotic Lily Ho (Pai Mei) and the princess of kung-fu films Hsu Feng (Yao Yao), play three women who live together and compare notes as to what would make them happy in love, in life, then go out to find it. Pai Mei wants money at all costs, Chu Tai will marry as soon as the opportunity arises and Yao Yao is saving her virginity for Mr. Right. Read More »

Stanley Kwan – Lan Yu (2001)

Quote:
Beijing, 1988. On the cusp of middle-age, Chen Handong has known little but success all his life. The eldest son of a senior government bureaucrat, he heads a fast-growing trading company and plays as hard as he works. Few know that Handong’s tastes run more to boys than girls. Lan Yu is a country boy, newly arrived in Beijing to study architecture. More than most students, he is short of money and willing to try anything to earn some. He has run into Liu Zheng, who pragmatically suggests that he could prostitute himself for one night to a gay pool-hall and bar owner. Read More »

Various – Hsi nou ai le aka Four Moods (King Hu et al) (1970)

Directors Hu, Li Hsing and Pai Ching-jui jointly produced “In Four Moods”, with Hu directing the second dazzling episode, “Anger” (1970). Thirteen years later, the three directed the trilogy “The Wheel of Life” (1983), focusing on three lives and three love affairs occurring at different times. Hu’s first episode, though short, was riveting.
“Zen and Sense in King Hu’s Films” Read More »

Jiayin Liu – Niupi er AKA Oxhide II (2009)

Quote:
Just as in her previous film, Oxhide, the Chinese director films herself and her parents in their rather claustrophobic apartment with documentary realism. She uses nine fixed camera positions, with which she turns clockwise around the kitchen table (so that the last shot has exactly the same perspective as the first). The shots, from 5 to 20 minutes long, were made from close by, so that the three family members largely remain off-screen. The resulting rigorously minimalist story passes in real time: Oxhide II is as long as it takes to clear a worktable, to prepare Chinese dumplings on it and to eat them. While the meal is being prepared, the three talk occasionally about the problems surrounding their bag shop, with the wife and daughter having a serious word with the father. However, as long as they talk about making dumplings, the family is united. Read More »