Tag Archives: Marcello Mastroianni

Mauro Bolognini – Il bell’Antonio (1960)

Women love handsome Antonio because they think of him as the perfect lover. But he has problems to fullfill this ideal and Barbara only notices his failures when they are married. When the town learns about his trouble they start laughing at him… Read More »

Luigi Comencini – La Donna della domenica aka The Sunday Woman (1975)

Synopsis:
Police commissioner Santamaria is investigating the murdering of the ambiguous architect Mr. Garrone. The investigations soon drive him into the Torino’s high society. Santamaria suspect Anna Carla and at the same time falls in love for her. Lello is the lover of Massimo, a homosexual platonic friend of Anna Carla. He is following another direction in order to find out the truth, and his results are confusing the Policeman. But another murdering happens… Read More »

Federico Fellini – Otto e mezzo AKA 8½ [+commentary] (1963)

Quote:

8 1/2 weaves fluidly through the visually intoxicating landscape of Federico Fellini’s subconscious, seemingly to seek inspiration and validation for his life and work. In an opening scene that symbolizes much of Fellini’s films, a suffocating man, trapped inside his car, inexplicably begins to float into the skies, only to be abruptly tugged back to the ground. But it is also an indelible image that shatters any preconceived illusion of “typical” elements in a Fellini film. The film, 8 1/2, literally marks Fellini’s work on 8 1/2 feature films (the “1/2” derived from collaborative direction films), and proves to be a transitional film in his artistic career. Read More »

Vittorio De Sica – Ieri, oggi, domani AKA Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow (1963)

Stories about three very different women and the men they attract.

Episode 1. In Naples the street trader Adelina is sentenced to prison for selling bootleg cigarettes. The lawyer Verace tells her husband Carmine that according to the law a woman cannot be put in prison when she is pregnant and six months after the delivery. Adelina and Carmine start procreating one child after another to avoid imprisonment, but after the 7th child is born, Carmine is burned out and cannot make love anymore. Read More »

Jacques Demy – L’Événement le plus important depuis que l’homme a marché sur la lune AKA A Slightly Pregnant Man (1973)

Synopsis:
A male Parisian driving school owner who goes to see his doctor and complains of feeling run down is pronounced four months pregnant. When the diagnosis is confirmed by a specialist, the result is an international media frenzy. Read More »

Mario Monicelli – I compagni AKA The Organizer (1963)

In turn-of-the-twentieth-century Turin, an accident in a textile factory incites workers to stage a walkout. But it’s not until they receive unexpected aid from a traveling professor (Marcello Mastroianni) that they find their voice, unite, and stand up for themselves. This historical drama by Mario Monicelli, brimming with humor and honesty, is a beautiful and moving ode to the power of the people, and features engaging, naturalistic performances; cinematography by the great Giuseppe Rotunno; and a multilayered, Oscar-nominated screenplay by Monicelli, Agenore Incrocci, and Furio Scarpelli. Read More »

Christopher Morahan – Diamonds for Breakfast (1968)

Quote:
BRAND NEW 2K MASTER! Four thieves try to steal the Imperial Jewels of Russia! Swinging playboy Grand Duke Nicholas Wladimirovitch Goduno (Marcello Mastroianni, Marriage Italian Style), a direct descendent of the Romanov family who were overthrown in the Russian Revolution of 1917, learns that his family’s crown jewels will be exhibited at a London museum and plots to steal them. He gathers a crew of beautiful but dangerous women, led by Bridget Rafferty (Rita Tushingham, The Knack… and How to Get It), to assist in his plot against Popov (Warren Mitchell, The Crawling Eye), the Soviet functionary in charge of the exhibit. Wonderfully directed by Christopher Morahan (Clockwise) and beautifully shot by Gerry Turpin (Seance on a Wet Afternoon, The Whisperers). Read More »