Tag Archives: Mario Adorf

Michael Schaack – Felidae [+Extras] (1994)

Francis, a tomcat, and his “can opener,” a writer of pulp romances, move into a new neighborhood, where a feline serial killer appears to be on the loose.

Gifted with an inquisitive temperament beyond that of the typical house cat, he befriends a battle-scarred and foul-mouthed tom by the name of Bluebeard, who shares the belief of the other cats in the neighborhood that the bloody murders are the work of a human. Francis thinks that the evidence points to another cat, and sets out to sniff out the culprit. Read More »

Massimo Dallamano – La polizia chiede aiuto AKA What Have They Done to Your Daughters? (1974)


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Synopsis:
“Police investigate apparent suicide of teen girl and uncover details of a teenage prostitution racket. They go on the hunt for a motorcycle riding killer.”
– IMDb Read More »

Volker Schlöndorff – Die Blechtrommel AKA The Tin Drum [Director’s Cut] (1979)

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Quote:
“A country unable to mourn,” Volker Schlöndorff wrote in his journal as he adapted Günter Grass’ novel, The Tin Drum. “Germany, to this day, is the poisoned heart of Europe.” When the film premiered in West German cinemas in early May 1979, it figured within a country’s larger (and, in many minds, long overdue) reckoning with a legacy of shame and violence. Indeed, the Nazi past haunted the nation’s screens, more so than it ever had since the end of World War II. The American miniseries Holocaust aired that year on public television in February and catalyzed wide discussion about Germany’s responsibility for the Shoah. Later that month, Peter Lilienthal’s David gained accolades at the Berlin Film Festival for its stirring depiction of a young Jewish boy living underground in the Reich’s capital during the deportations to the camps. History returned as film; retrospective readings of the Third Reich by Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Alexander Kluge, Edgar Reitz, Helma Sanders-Brahms, and Hans-Jürgen Syberberg (among others) would become the calling card of the New German Cinema and bring this group of critical filmmakers an extraordinary international renown. In 1979, The Tin Drum won the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival. A year later, it would become the first feature from the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) to receive an Oscar for best foreign film. Read More »

Antonio Pietrangeli – La visita AKA The Visitor [+Extras] (1964)

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Synopsis by Sandra Brennan
In this drama, a single woman approaching 40 grows bored of her affair with a married trucker and writes to a singles column. She ends up paired with an outwardly conservative bookstore clerk. During their date, he drinks and soon turns into a rude, crude, drunken slob. She is mortified until he apologizes. She forgives him and they have sex. In the morning they resume their former lives. Perhaps they will meet again. Perhaps not. Read More »

Danièle Huillet & Jean-Marie Straub – Klassenverhältnisse AKA Class Relations [+Extras] (1984)

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Klassenverhältnisse, known in English as “Class Relations” is based on Franz Kafka’s unfinished first novel, Der Verschollene.

The story describes the bizarre wanderings of a 17-year-old European emigrant named Karl Rossmann in Amerika… Read More »