Martin Scorsese

  • Ian Christie – Arrows of Desire: The Films of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (1994)

    1991-2000BooksIan ChristieUSA
    The Films of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (1985)
    The Films of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger (1985)

    Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger formed the greatest creative partnership in the history of British Cinema – The Archers.
    Their films were often controversial: Churchill tried to suppress the release of The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp. Later, The Red Shoes and The Tales of Hoffman startled and enchanted cinema audiences with their use of colour, form and music. In the last ten years the magic, poetry and passion of their work has been acknowledged around the world and they are firmly in the pantheon of film masters.Read More »

  • Martin Scorsese – Public Speaking (2010)

    Martin Scorsese2001-2010DocumentaryUSA
    Public Speaking (2010)
    Public Speaking (2010)

    Gina Befellafante New York Times
    To many Americans — millions, really — the name Fran Lebowitz doesn’t mean much. But in certain precincts, vital to the cultural functioning of both coasts, she is famously a friend, a crank, a climber, a cautionary tale, an iconoclast and a mouth. In “Public Speaking,” Martin Scorsese’s enormously enjoyable and perceptive documentary about her, Ms. Lebowitz’s endearing narcissism is a study in the notion that arrogance and insecurity are largely two sides of the same cocktail coaster.Read More »

  • Martin Scorsese – The King of Comedy (1982)

    Martin Scorsese1981-1990ComedyDramaUSA
    The King of Comedy (1982)
    The King of Comedy (1982)

    Plot:
    Rupert Pupkin (De Niro), a stage-door autograph hound, is an aspiring stand-up comic with obsessive ambition far in excess of any actual talent. A chance meeting with Jerry Langford (Lewis), a famous comedian and talk show host, leads Rupert to believe that his “big break” has finally come. His attempts to get a place on the show are continually rebuffed by Langford’s staff and, finally, by Langford himself. Along the way, Rupert indulges in elaborate and obsessive fantasies where he and Langford are colleagues and friends.Read More »

  • Martin Scorsese – Bringing Out the Dead (1999)

    1991-2000ComedyDramaMartin ScorseseUSA

    This tense urban drama stars Nicolas Cage as Frank Pierce, a paramedic on the brink of physical and emotional collapse. Frank has worked for years in one of New York’s most brutal neighborhoods, and the pressure of his job has taken its toll; plagued with self-doubt, he is haunted by the spirits of the people he couldn’t save, and while he desperately wants to quit his job, outside forces won’t let him walk away. Bringing Out the Dead brought director Martin Scorsese back to the streets of contemporary New York, one of his favorite locations, after three films set elsewhere: Kundun, Casino, and The Age of Innocence. The film also reunited Scorsese with screenwriter Paul Schrader, who scripted Taxi Driver, Raging Bull, and The Last Temptation of Christ. The supporting cast includes Patricia Arquette as the daughter of a heart attack victim that Frank has fallen in love with, and John Goodman and Ving Rhames as two of Frank’s fellow drivers. — Mark DemingRead More »

  • Martin Scorsese – The Aviator (2004)

    Drama2001-2010Martin ScorseseUSA

    A biopic depicting the early years of legendary director and aviator Howard Hughes’ career, from the late 1920s to the mid-1940s.Read More »

  • Martin Scorsese – No Direction Home: Bob Dylan (2005)

    2001-2010DocumentaryMartin ScorseseMusicalUnited Kingdom

    IMDB:
    Portrait of an artist as a young man. Roughly chronological, using archival footage intercut with recent interviews, a story takes shape of Bob Dylan’s (b. 1941) coming of age from 1961 to 1966 as a singer, songwriter, performer, and star. He takes from others: singing styles, chord changes, and rare records. He keeps moving: on stage, around New York City and on tour, from Suze Rotolo to Joan Baez and on, from songs of topical witness to songs of raucous independence, from folk to rock. He drops the past. He refuses, usually with humor and charm, to be simplified, classified, categorized, or finalized: always becoming, we see a shapeshifter on a journey with no direction home.Read More »

  • Martin Scorsese – Boxcar Bertha (1972)

    Martin Scorsese1971-1980CrimeExploitationUSA

    Quote:
    ‘Boxcar’ Bertha Thompson, a transient woman in Arkansas during the violence-filled Depression of the early ‘30s, meets up with rabble-rousing union man ’Big’ Bill Shelly and the two team up to fight the corrupt railroad establishment. Based on “Sister of the Road,” the 1937 pseudo-autobiography of fictional character Bertha Thompson, written by anarchist physician Dr. Ben L. Reitman.Read More »

  • Martin Scorsese & Michael Henry Wilson – A Personal Journey with Martin Scorsese Through American Movies (1995)

    1991-2000DocumentaryMartin ScorseseMichael Henry WilsonUSA

    Quote:
    Martin Scorsese describes his initial and growing obsession with films from the 1940s and 50s as the art form developed and grew with clips from classics and cult classics.Read More »

  • Martin Scorsese – Il Mio viaggio in Italia AKA My Voyage to Italy (1999)

    1991-2000DocumentaryItalyMartin Scorsese

    A follow-up to his 1995 television documentary A Personal Journey With Martin Scorsese Through American Movies, Martin Scorsese’s My Voyage to Italy (Il Mio Viaggio in Italia) is a thrilling trip through six decades of seminal, great and near-great Italian films so dear to the celebrated Sicilian-American filmmaker. Easing us through a rich cornucopia of high-quality, largely black-and-white clips, Scorsese, who serves as an eloquent and lucid onscreen and offscreen commentator, makes highly personal and not always popular choices. Still, even when the clips are unfamiliar, the New York-based director, whose Gangs of New York is scheduled for release early next year, conveys with passion and clarity why these films are important to him and should be to us.Read More »

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