Tag Archives: Mary Pickford

D.W. Griffith – Friends (1912)

At the mining-camp of Golden Creek, the little orphan girl of the late proprietor of Golden Creek Inn is the pet of all the miners. Her father had long been their great friend and adviser, and hence his little daughter always commanded their greatest respect. She becomes greatly infatuated with Dandy Jack, who is considered by all as her sweetheart. Jack decides to leave the camp for other diggings, and the little one is almost heartbroken. As he is leaving, he meets Bob, his old chum, who has just arrived at the camp. Their greeting shows clearly the value of that little word “friends.” Later on, Bob comes to the Inn and falls deeply in love with the little orphan, who has realized by this time that her feeling for Jack was infatuation rather than love. Hence she and Bob are engaged to be married. Shortly before the day set for the wedding, Jack returns and is twitted by the boys about the apparently fickle girl, whereupon he wagers that he can win her back, not knowing, of course, who the successful suitor is. The outcome is a revelation to all. Read More »

D.W. Griffith – The New York Hat (1912)

The young village minister was not quite as discreet as he might have been in fulfilling the strange trust left by the dying mother, but it certainly worked for the common good. By the bequest the mother desired that her daughter possess some of the finery previously denied her. As a result the minister and Mary were linked in a scandal, with the church board in judgment. Gossip received the laugh, however, as it generally does, while the minister assumed a trust quite unexpected. Read More »

Maurice Tourneur – The Poor Little Rich Girl [+extra] (1917)

Quote:
Gwen’s family is rich, but her parents ignore her and most of the servants push her around, so she is lonely and unhappy. Her father is concerned only with making money, and her mother cares only about her social position. But one day a servant’s irresponsibility creates a crisis that causes everyone to rethink what is important to them. Read More »