Tag Archives: Masatoshi Nagase

Gô Rijû – Berlin (1997)

When a woman whose job is to professionally date men disappears suddenly a TV crew who wanted to film a documentary about women like her begin searching for her. Coincidentally, a salaryman who saw the disappeared woman and wants to meet her again is found and joins the crew. Read More »

Sabu AKA Hiroyuki Tanaka – Happiness (2016)

Quote:
Kanjaki, a middle-aged man, goes to a quiet countryside village. He puts his helmet on a shrunken old woman whom he meets by chance in a shop. As soon as he presses the buttons on the helmet one by one, she suddenly remembers forgotten happy moments and is rejuvenated. This is just the beginning. Kanjaki goes on to make the village people recall their happy pasts, but his face is lined with worry and a sadness that deepens. What is the secret of this helmet? And what is he trying to do with it? Director Sabu’s Happiness suggests happiness and suffering are intertwined through the unusual scenario of a helmet reminding people of the happiest moments of their lives. Sabu convincingly portrays the notion that memory is the source of both happiness and suffering, and how memory affects our lives. Read More »

Katsuhito Ishii – Party 7 (2000)

IMDB:
Seven characters, introduced at the start of the film, get thrown together into the same hotel room: a thief who’s stolen a suitcase of money from the mob, his ex-girlfriend, her obsessive boyfriend, the mob soldier sent to retrieve the briefcase, another mobster sent to kill them, master voyeur Captain Banana and his new apprentice, The Mister Yellow. Who will end up with the money? Read More »

Clara Law – Qiu yue AKA Autumn Moon (1992)

A young video camera-wielding Japanese tourist traveling alone in Hong Kong pursues a tentative relationship with a Chinese teenager planning to join her family in Canada. Wai invites the young man to join her for a spectacular home-cooked meal made by her 80-year old grandmother. As their platonic friendship develops, the subtle relationships between generations, upheavals in traditional Hong Kong society and the clash between Asian cultural identities are explored with considerable warmth, charm and humor. Read More »

Jim Jarmusch – Mystery Train (1989)

Quote:
A Japanese couple obsessed with 1950s America goes to Memphis because the male half of the couple emulates Carl Perkins. Chance encounters link three different stories in the city, with the common thread being the seedy hotel where they are all staying. Read More »

Kaizo Hayashi – Wana AKA The Trap [+Extras] (1996)

Quote:
The 3 Part of the Maiku Hama Triology is the best and probably darkest of all the films. In fact, this episode is more of a horror-like thriller reminiscent of a Takashi Miike film. “The Trap,” which is the final film of the trilogy was preceded by the more semi-comical episodes of “The Most Terrible Time In My Life,” and then followed by “Stairway To The Distant Past,” and finally concluding with this film, “The Trap.” In the previous episodes of the trilogy, Maiku Hama (Masatoshi Nagase) is not the aloof private detective he was originally portrayed as; but a much more intelligent and calm detective. Read More »

Kaizo Hayashi – Harukana jidai no kaidan o AKA The Stairway To The Distant Past [+Extras] (1995)

Quote:
Stairway to the Distant Past is the second film in the Mike Hama Private Investigator Trilogy. If you’ve seen part one The Most Terrible Time in My Life you must seek this out to find out how all your favourite characters are getting on. The films themes are age and family as Mikes mother “Dynamite Sexy Lilly” returns to Yokohama with her strip act many years after deserting Mike and his sister Akane. She reveals who Mikes father is and he sets out to find him. This films DoP deserves an Oscar as the picture is stunningly shot – it reminded me most of the Cinema du Look of Luc Besson and Leos Carax. Read More »