Tag Archives: Mel Ferrer

Sergio Sollima – Il corsaro nero AKA The Black Corsair (1976)

Quote:
Emilio di Roccabruna count of Ventimiglia is fighting Van Gould who ten years before had killed his father and stolen his family properties. He is known as “Il Corsaro Nero” (The Black Corsair) and his two brothers as Il Corsaro Verde (The Green Corsair) and as Il Corsaro Rosso (The Red Corsair). But the Green Corsair and the Red Corsair are killed treacherously by Van Gould’s men while the Black Corsair is entirely taken up by saving an Indian village from the Spaniards. He can save only Yara. Later on he organizes with the help of Morgan his revenge. Read More »

Mario Monicelli – Proibito (1954)

Don Paolo, a young parson troubled by his love for Agnese, tries to make peace in a little village in Sardinia where two families are at war.

Don Paolo, Sardinian priest, returns home as a pastor in his native town, torn by hatred and revenge. He tries to restore peace and confidence in the law and deter Agnes, in love with him. He succeeds, but it’s hard.
In the film’s figurative and narrative scheme, in his vague westerns impression, fostered by the intense beauty of the landscape, the character of Nazzari, compared to the somewhat fuzzy others, has coherence and vitality. Read More »

Sergio Martino – Morte Sospetta Di Una Minorenne AKA The Suspicious Death of a Minor (1975)

Synopsis:
At a dance hall, inspector Germi flirts with a young prostitute who’s found brutally murdered only a short time later. On his manhunt for the vicious killer, he’s joined by pickpocket Giannino who gives his hands-on assist to the inspector’s unorthodox investigative methods. The bloodstained track leads cop and robber into a depraved world of white slavery, child kidnapping and corruption. Read More »

Tobe Hooper – Eaten Alive (1976)

Quote:
“Eaten Alive” is director Tobe Hooper’s 1977 follow up to “The Texas Chain Saw Massacre” (1974). While it is still a horror film that takes place in the deep South, it is a much different kind of film, and much like “Texas Chain Saw’s” first sequel, deals with a lot of humor, as well as over-the-top violence.

The story starts with an awkward semi-rape scene involving Buck (played by a young Robert Englund) and a young prostitute. Englund has said that the Japanese version of this opening sequence inserted images of a stunt double’s genitalia, though the American version was more tame. Read More »