Tag Archives: Nathalie Baye

Claude Goretta – La provinciale AKA The Girl From Lorraine (1981)

Draughtswoman Nathalie Baye moves to Paris. This is the tale of her sad encounters and experiences, and the dignity she retains.
Aside from the subdued and true-to-life quality that Claude Goretta’s movies share – in my opinion – with his fellow Swiss Alain Tanner, this is a deeply emotional and depressing film. Nathalie Baye is – as usual – incredibly beautiful, moving and convincing. Read More »

Robin Davis – J’ai épousé une ombre aka I Married a Dead Man (1983)

Heavily pregnant Helene (Nathalie Baye) is on a train, on the run from her abusive boyfriend (Richard Bohringer), when she meets the also-pregnant Patricia. When a train-crash kills Patricia and her intended husband, Helene is mistaken for her and adopted by her new in-laws. Helene assumes this new identity, trying to secure a future for her baby, and finds a charmed life on a Bordeaux vineyard. However, the specter of the past threatens her newfound happiness. Read More »

Xavier Beauvois – Le Petit Lieutenant AKA The Young Lieutenant (2005)

A rookie policeman from provincial Le Havre volunteers for the high pressure Parisian homicide bureau and is assigned to a middle-aged woman detective. Read More »

Claude Berri – L’Un reste, l’autre part AKA One Stays, the Other Leaves (2005)

“I try to make films that move people when they are in the theater and make them think only after they leave.” Claude Berri

L’un reste, L’autre part is the story of two old time friends, both in their fifties, both married, who fall for two younger women. The cast is nothing less than stellar: Daniel Auteuil, Nathalie Baye, Pierre Arditi, Miou-Miou and Charlotte Gainsbourg

Attal’s real-life wife, Charlotte Gainsbourg, appears as one of two romantic foils a character drama in which over-middle-age men fall in love with younger women and must confront the ramifications of ending their marriages (one does and one doesn’t, or so the title would have you believe). Read More »

Tonie Marshall – Vénus Beauté (institut) AKA Venus Beauty Institute (1999)

In this visually stylish comedy, Angele is an attractive woman just edging into middle age who is looking for companionship without commitment. Her co-worker Samantha has more boyfriends than she knows what to do with, and Marie, the youngest of the group, is still learning the ropes of love. Read More »

François Truffaut – La chambre verte AKA The Green Room (1978)

Synopsis:
A French little town, at the end of the twenties. Julien Davenne is a journalist whose wife Julie died a decade ago. He gathered in the green room all Julie’s objects. When a fire destroys the room, he renovates a little chapel and devotes it to Julie and his other dead persons. Read More »

Maurice Pialat – La gueule ouverte AKA The Mouth Agape (1974)

Jonathan Rosenbaum wrote:
“Pialat’s third feature takes up a theme which, on the face of it, could not seem more uninviting: a middle-aged woman dying of cancer, and how this affects her husband and son. But what Pialat makes of this is so recognisable, embarrassing and moving – even, on occasion, funny – that he more than justifies his use of a forbidding subject. He has ideas about how emotions involving sex and death are intimately related – and about the clarity and lack of it that they shed on everything else, as son and father each go lusting after every woman in sight. He has ideas about cinema, too, and an expressive style that can encapsulate a lifetime of memories in a single shot. Without a trace of sentimentality or easy effect, this seemingly semi-autobiographical work is as intense in its way as The Mother and the Whore, and unforgettable.” Read More »