Tag Archives: Nikita Mikhalkov

Nikita Mikhalkov – 12 aka 12 razgnevannyh muzhchin (2007)

Twelve jurors must decide the fate of a Chechen adolescent charged with murdering his stepfather. Read More »

Eldar Ryazanov – Zhestokiy romans AKA A Cruel Romance (1984)

A lavish two-part costume tragedy based on the classic The Dowerless Girl by the nineteenth-century playwright Alexander Ostrovsky, A Cruel Romance (also known as Ruthless Romance) was the biggest Soviet box-office hit of 1984, though it seems to have had little international exposure until now.

It marked a change of direction for the veteran Eldar Ryazanov, who up to then had tended to specialise in contemporary comedy, though it seems to have done his career little harm: he was made a People’s Artist of the Soviet Union that year – and no wonder, quite apart from the film’s commercial success, its mostly wart-ridden portrait of the venal, money-grubbing bourgeoisie of the then-discredited Tsarist era must have gone down a storm with the Soviet authorities. Read More »

Aleksei Balabanov – Zhmurki AKA Dead Man’s Bluff [+Extras] (2005)

Quote:
When brothers Simon and Sergei bungle an important drug deal on behalf of the local crime kingpin, they’re forced to make up for it by retrieving a lost batch of heroin. Trouble is, they have no idea where to begin. This shrewd gangster satire includes some 20 Russian film stars among its ensemble cast, cleverly costuming each big name to leave viewers guessing who’s who. Read More »

Eldar Ryazanov – Vokzal dlya dvoikh AKA Railway Station For Two (1983)

Summary:
Platon Ryabinin, a pianist, is traveling by train to a distant town of Griboedov to visit his father. He gets off to have lunch during a twenty minute stop at Zastupinsk railway station. He meets Vera, a waitress, after he refuses to pay her for the disgusting food he doesn’t even touch and misses his train due to police investigation of the incident. His passport is then accidentally taken away from him by Andrei, Vera’s fiancé, and his money is stolen as he waits for the next train to Griboedov. Vera learns that Platon is about to get sentenced and sent to prison in the Far East for a car accident he isn’t guilty for. During the few days that Platon has to spend in Zastupinsk he and Vera develop feelings for each other…
– Written by Denis Chebikin Read More »

Nikita Mikhalkov – Neskolko dney iz zhizni I.I. Oblomova AKA A Few Days in the Life of I.I. Oblomov (1979)

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Russian director Nikita Mikhalkov takes a break from emulating his beloved Chekhov to film the classic Ivan Goncharov novel Oblomov. The title character (played by Oleg Tabakov) is a 19th century Russian civil servant and landlord who chooses to go to bed one day–and never get up. Preferring to sleep his way through life rather than confront it, Oblomov is shaken from his slumbers by the arrival of a childhood friend Shtoltz. A series of flashbacks show why it is that this friend’s presence gets Oblomov out of his ‘jammies and back on his feet. Also known as A Few Days in the Life of I. I. Oblomov, this sprightly film is an excellent early example of the work of the director who would win a 1994 Oscar for his Burnt by the Sun. ~ Hal Erickson, All Movie Guide
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Nikita Mikhalkov – Pyat vecherov aka Five Evenings (1979)

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Quote:
Based on the play by Alexander Volodin. The set is the 1950s. The tangible world of an old communal apartment is recreated onscreen with an incredible accuracy, every thing capturing the flair of the time. The stylized visuals, the curious objects, the amusing inhabitants, so charming and exotic… There are all the marks of the ‘retro’ style, which is always ‘in’. The actors Ludmila Gurchenko and Stanislav Lyubshin succeeded in conveying everything that they couldn’t say openly. The finale allows for different interpretations. Hence the emotions evoked by this impeccably made melodrama appear to be even more poignant.Once Alexander and Tamara were in love. But the war had separated them… Twenty long years after, they meet again, but they lack the courage to admit that their feelings are still alive. Unable to overcome their pride, they try to convince each other that both are doing just fine…
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Nikita Mikhalkov – Rodnya AKA Kinfolk (1981)

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One of the most popular movies tells, in an ironic manner, about complicated relationships between close people. Among the film’s achievements is not only splendid acting, but also the fact that “Kinfolk” remains as contemporary and topical as before. The relations between a son-in-law and a mother-in-law are as everlasting a theme as love itself. Especially when the role of the son-in-law Stasik is brilliantly played by Yuri Bogatyryov, and that of the mother-in-law by the incomparable Nonna Mordyukova. Marusya Konovalova, a kind, simple-hearted country woman, comes to Moscow to visit her only daughter (Svetlana Kryuchkova) and tries to help “glue together” her broken-up family. Acting with best intentions, she cannot understand why her interference provokes a stormy protest…First film role of Oleg Menshikov. N. Mikhalkov, A. Adabashyan and P. Lebeshev as waiters and cooks!

Source :ruscico.com
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