Tag Archives: Patrice Chéreau

Patrice Chéreau – Ceux qui m’aiment prendront le train AKA Those Who Love Me Can Take the Train (1998)

Quote:
In the twilight of his life, Jean-Baptiste, a painter who has always lived in Paris, says he wants to be buried in Limoges: “Those who love me can take the train”. So begins a sad, wild and marvellous journey which unites all the people that he had touched during his lifetime – his lovers, lovers’ lovers, ex-lover’s new wives, old friends, casual acqaintances, and relatives. But their shared mourning cannot conceal the heartbrakes, rivalries, jealousies and passions wich all simmer to the surface and will – over the course of the journey, funeral and wake, reach some kind of resolution. Read More »

Patrice Chéreau – Hôtel de France (1987)

Quote:
At the age of 20 Michel was going out with Sonia and was the charismatic leader of their group of friends, and the one that everyone thought would “go far”. But Michel did not live up to their expectations. Ten years later, the friends meet up again…
In 1987, Patrice Chereau had been heading up the Theatre des Amandiers for two years. The previous year he staged a contemporary production of Chekov’s Platonov with his students from the Ecole des comediens de Nanterre-Amandiers. It was them, Valeria Bruni-Tedeschi, Vincent Perez, Marianne Denicourt, Agnes Jaoui, that he brought onto the film set to adapt his own theatrical adaptation for the cinema. It is a great pleasure to see the first steps in front of the camera of these as yet unknown actors in Hotel de France. Read More »

Patrice Chéreau – Persécution (2009)

Synopsis:
The solitary Daniel and Sonia share an uneasy love/hate relationship. Daniel’s life is disrupted by the appearance of a stranger that proceeds to insinuate himself in his life. The man’s persistence takes its toll on Daniel and Sonia, leaving Daniel alone with nagging questions of “Why?” Read More »

Patrice Chéreau – Intimacy (2001)

Quote:
Jay, a failed musician, walked out of his family and now earns a living as head bartender in a trendy London pub. Every Wednesday afternoon a woman comes to his house for graphic, almost wordless, sex. One day Jay follows her and finds out about the rest of her life (and that her name is Claire). This eventually disrupts their relationship. Read More »

Patrice Chéreau – La chair de l’orchidée AKA Flesh and the Orchid (1975)

A young woman, Claire, escapes from a lunatic asylum and falls under the protection of Louis Delage, a loner who rears horses for a living. When the man whom Louis has been sheltering is killed, both Claire and Louis become targets for a pair of unknown assassins. In the adventure that follows, Claire discovers why she was locked away in an asylum – her aunt wanted to prevent her from inheriting her father’s fortune. When the two killers make the same discovery, they kidnap Claire in order to extort a ransom, whilst continuing their pursuit for Louis. The outcome is far from pleasant… Read More »

Youssef Chahine – Adieu Bonaparte AKA Farewell Bonaparte (1985)

Quote:
In 1798, Napoleon lands his army in Egypt, defeats the Mameluke warlords (the remnants of Ottoman rule), and goes on to Cairo. Three brothers, who are Egyptian patriots, chafe under Mameluke rule and reject the prospect of French domination. Bakr, the eldest, is a hothead, quick to advocate armed rebellion; Ali is more philosophical and poetic; Yehia is young and impressionable. One of Napoleon’s generals, the one-legged intellectual Caffarelli, wants to make Frenchmen out of Ali, Yehia, and other Egyptians, opening a bakery where their father works, becoming a tutor, and declaring his love for them. Is tragedy the only resolution of these conflicting loyalties? Read More »