Tag Archives: Radley Metzger

Radley Metzger – The Lickerish Quartet (1970)

A jaded, wealthy couple watch a blue movie in their castle home along with her adult son. The son is testy, so they go into town and watch a circus-like thrill ride. The daredevil woman in the show looks exactly like one of the women in the movie, so the man invites her to join them for a nightcap. Tensions among the family seem to rise. She stays overnight, and during her 24 hours in the castle, each of its three residents involves her in a fantasy. She, in turn, keeps asking, “Who has the gun?” Will there be violence before it’s over? Read More »

Radley Metzger – Maraschino Cherry (1978)

Metzger’s Farewell to Charms
Dries Vermeulen6 March 2010
The last and least-liked of Radley Metzger’s explicit quintet shows the talented filmmaker now almost dispensing with plot altogether, a trend he previously toyed with on his free form BARBARA BROADCAST in a radical departure from the classic three act structure, borrowed from stage and screen lore since times immemorial, he previously and rigorously adhered to. Though he has never gone on record about it, my guess is that Metzger realized he had pretty much expanded the fornication film form to its genre-imposed limits with THE OPENING OF MISTY BEETHOVEN and was now gently phasing himself out of what was indeed increasingly becoming an industry (rather than art form) he had entered somewhat reluctantly in the first place out of economic necessity as the commercial availability of hardcore had made simulated screen sex obsolete. Read More »

Radley Metzger – Camille 2000 (1969)

“Camille 2000, with its cast of wealthy, weary sophisticates, clear plastic blow-up beds, outlandish metal dresses, refined S&M orgies, and Euro-psychedelic music, is often cited as the quintessential Metzger film. In fact, all that’s missing in the world of the doomed romantic Marguerite Gautier (Daniele Gaubert) is a gilded go-go cage. Fans of the 1935 Garbo version may be startled to see that Metzger’s update, underneath the wild period decor, is recognizably the same story, though Gaubert’s existential exhaustion may be less evident to an audience mesmerized by the parade of Italian haute couture and decor.” – Gary Morris, Bright Lights Film Journal Read More »