Tag Archives: Riccardo Freda

Riccardo Freda – Maciste alla corte del Gran Khan AKA Samson and the Seven Miracles of the World (1961)

The Emperor of China, facing harsh attacks from the Tartars, enlists the help of the Grand Khan of the Mongols. But he betrays the Emperor and intend to despatch this usurper of the Celestial Empire. In truth, the Grand Khan need only kill the rightful heirs to the throne, Prince Kalaf and Princess Li-Ling to definitely insure power for himself. But with the arrival of the hero Maciste, the tyrant is forced to change his plans. Read More »

Riccardo Freda – L’iguana dalla lingua di fuoco AKA The Iguana with the Tongue of Fire (1971)

Synopsis:
In Dublin, a young woman is brutally murdered in her home by a maniac that throws acid in her face and then slits her throat with a razor. Her mangled body is later discovered in the boot of a limousine owned by the Swiss Ambassador Sobiesky. The Ambassador, who was the dead woman’s lover, refuses to cooperate with the police due to his diplomatic immunity. John Norton, an ex-cop famed for his brutal working methods, is brought in to help and gets too deeply involved when he stars an affair with the Ambassador’s beautiful step-daughter, Helen. Meanwhile, the brutal killings continue… Read More »

Riccardo Freda – Il magnifico avventuriero AKA The Magnificent Adventurer (1963)

PLOT & Review:
Benvenuto Cellini (1500-71) knows no obstacles (or scruples) when he has to create a work of art or win the heart (and the rest) of a woman.
R. Freda does a genuinely popular cinema, practicing many genres, from drama to horror. Faced with a film of adventure, as here, he can be concise and engaging.
(Morandini) Read More »

Riccardo Freda – Il cavaliere misterioso AKA The Mysterious Rider (1948)

Quote:
However trivial – or downright ridiculous – the plot may become, Freda shows a mastery of sheer cinematic style that puts most of the more highly-touted Italian directors to shame. Like Minnelli or Sirk, Mizoguchi or Ophuls, Visconti or Fellini, he is in love with the visual and sensuous possibilities of the camera itself. The breathtaking decor and costumes (by Vittorio Nino Novarese, who went on to dress the most elephantine of Hollywood epics) are as strong a dramatic presence as the actors themselves. That’s no slight against the cast: Gassman was as great an actor as Marcello Mastroianni; Sanson and Canale are as strong as they are sensual, as gutsy as they are glamorous – a world away from the insipid sex objects that decorate most action movies! Read More »