Tag Archives: Robert De Niro

Elia Kazan – The Last Tycoon (1976)

The Last Tycoon (1976) is a feature dramatic film based upon Harold Pinter’s screenplay adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Last Tycoon, sometimes known as The Love of the Last Tycoon.

Directed by Elia Kazan and produced by Sam Spiegel, the film starred Robert De Niro as “Monroe Stahr,” Tony Curtis as “Rodriguez,” Robert Mitchum as “Pat Brady,” Jack Nicholson as “Brimmer,” Donald Pleasence as “Boxley”, Jeanne Moreau as “Didi” and Theresa Russell as “Cecilia Brady”. Read More »

Ulu Grosbard – True Confessions (1981)

Synopsis:
In Los Angeles, circa 1940, an embittered, once-corrupt cop named Tom Spellacy is investigating two murders: that of a priest found dead in a whorehouse, and that of a mutilated woman in a park. As he searches for the culprits, Spellacy uncovers an immense web of corruption, involving prostitutes, dirty cops and pornography. Even the Roman Catholic Church is implicated, particularly one Monsignor Des Spellacy, Tom’s brother. Although Des is innocent of any wrongdoing, his actions raise moral and religious issues that Tom must deal with, in order to solve these bizarre murders. Read More »

Martin Scorsese – Taxi Driver (1976)

Quote:
A mentally unstable Vietnam war veteran works as a nighttime taxi driver in New York City where the perceived decadence and sleaze feeds his urge to violently lash out, attempting to save a teenage prostitute in the process. Read More »

Alan Parker – Angel Heart (1987) (HD)

New York, 1955, Private Detective Harry Angel has a new case on his hands. Washed up crooner Johnny Favourite has gone missing. Witnesses, informants and anybody who might be holding clues are being murdered one by one. Angel is being kept awake at night by strange satanic visions and before long he suddenly finds himself being dragged into a world of sex, murder, voodoo and death. Read More »

Terry Gilliam – Brazil (1985)

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SYNOPSIS
Brazil constitutes Terry Gilliam’s enormously ambitious follow-up to his 1981 Time Bandits. It also represents the second installment in a trilogy of Gilliam films on imagination versus reality, that began with Bandits and ended in 1989 with The Adventures of Baron Munchausen. To create this wild, visually audacious satire, Gilliam combines dystopian elements from Orwell, Huxley and Kafka (plus a central character who mirrors Walter Mitty) with his own trademark, Monty Python-esque, jet black British humor and his gift for extraordinary visual invention. The results are thoroughly unprecedented in the cinema. Read More »

Bernardo Bertolucci – Novecento aka 1900 [Extras] (1976)

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Synopsis

Quote:
Bernardo Bertolucci’s vast historical melodrama used the massive popular, critical, and financial success of its predecessor, the scandalous LAST TANGO IN PARIS, to mount a production of epic scale. Cut down to four hours for its American release, the film utilizes an all-star Hollywood…
Bernardo Bertolucci’s vast historical melodrama used the massive popular, critical, and financial success of its predecessor, the scandalous LAST TANGO IN PARIS, to mount a production of epic scale. Cut down to four hours for its American release, the film utilizes an all-star Hollywood cast to tell its heavily Marxist tale of Italian peasants during the twentieth century. Two boys born on the same day are destined for divergent paths; Olmo (played by Gerard Depardeiu as an adult) is born to peasant parents and will become a passionate socialist, while Alfredo’s (Robert De Niro as an adult) bourgeois, landowning origins will lead him to ultimately embrace fascism. Driven by a sincere hope for and belief in political change, Bertolucci’s film is nonetheless made up of very humane individual stories; it concentrates on highly personal experiences of a politically-charged time, which color the little dramas of love, sex, family, and community. It is at once an epic poem and a political manifesto, and it is the product of a director who was unabashedly communist in his youth, contrasting markedly with later works like 2003’s THE DREAMERS. Read More »