Tag Archives: Robert Shaw

Guy Hamilton – Force 10 from Navarone (1978)

Whilst things might be slowly changing, Hollywood has been a boys’ club for a very long time. This has been reflected in the cinema it has produced, where’s there’s often a hefty dollop of bromance. Bringing a group of men together to undertake some sort of mission is a regular plot device. Whether that’s the likes of The Magnificent Seven (western), Where Eagles Dare (war), The Hangover (comedy) or Oceans 11 (crime). This is the premise behind Guy Hamilton’s Force 10 for Navarone. Read More »

Joseph Sargent – The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (1974)

Synopsis:
Right under everyone’s noses, a determined gang of four colour-coded and armed-to-the-teeth criminals manage to take over New York City’s Pelham 1-2-3 subway train. In a confined metro rail coach crammed with eighteen helpless passengers, the ruthless criminals threaten to start killing one hostage a minute, unless a massive one-million-dollar ransom in cash is delivered within an hour. Under those circumstances, a frenzied race against time begins, as the gruff Transit Authority police lieutenant, Zachary Garber, tries to outwit his cunning adversary, Mr Blue. However, above the surface, chaos reigns. Will they deliver the money in time before the first man dies? Read More »

Fred Zinnemann – A Man for All Seasons (1966)

Synopsis:
The story takes place in sixteenth century England. But men like Sir Thomas More, who love life yet have the moral fiber to lay down their lives for their principles, are found in every century. Concentrating on the last seven years of the English Chancellor’s life, the struggle between More and King Henry VIII hinges on Henry’s determination to break with Rome so he can divorce his current wife and wed again, and good Catholic More’s inability to go along with such heresy. More resigns as Chancellor, hoping to be able to live out his life as a private citizen. But Henry will settle for nothing less than that the much respected More give public approval to his headstrong course. Read More »

Ken Annakin – Battle of the Bulge (1965)

Synopsis:
American Lt. Col. Dan Kiley (Henry Fonda), a military intelligence whiz, discovers that the Nazis are planning to attack Allied forces near Belgium. Certain that the exhausted enemy can’t muster much force, Gen. Joe Grey (Robert Ryan) isn’t convinced by Kiley’s findings, and his men pay the price when the German tanks begin their offensive. In the heat of this key World War II battle, Kiley must come up with a plan when it becomes clear that the Nazis are trying to steal fuel from the Allies. Read More »

Joseph Losey – Figures in a Landscape (1970)

THE BIRD HAS COME FOR ITS PREY.

Two escaped convicts (Robert Shaw and Malcolm McDowell) are on the run in an unnamed Latin American country. But everywhere they go, they are followed and hounded by a menacing black helicopter. Read More »

Clive Donner – The Caretaker (1963)

Quote:
The Caretaker was the play that made Harold Pinter’s name when it was first performed at the Arts Theatre, London in 1960, and it remains probably his most famous. Two years later, Clive Donner’s film version began shooting, after producer Michael Birkett had raised the finance from figures such as Noel Coward, Richard Burton, Elizabeth Taylor, Peter Sellers, Peter Hall and Leslie Caron – all passionate admirers of the play. For the film, two of the cast of that original production – Donald Pleasence as Davies and Alan Bates as Mick – are joined by Robert Shaw as Aston, allowing us to see on film three of the greatest stage interpretations of Pinter’s characters. Donner’s sensitive film becomes a study of shared illusion, tragic dispossession and a fraternal bond of unspoken love, combining mesmerising performances and the magic of Pinter’s dialogue into a spellbinding film. Read More »