Tag Archives: Robert Stephens

Stephen Frears – One Fine Day (1979)

Quote:
George Phillips, a middle-aged Londoner, works as an estate agent for the firm of Frobisher, Rendell and Ross. His home life is soured by clashes with his wife over whether their teenage son’s girlfriend should be allowed to sleep over at their house, a situation the timid, melancholic George dislikes but hasn’t the guts to forbid. His professional life is dominated by his attempts to find a buyer for Sunley House, a once-fashionable 1960s office block which has lain unoccupied for over a year. When his wife leaves for Colchester to look after her elderly father, George avoids conflict with his son by sleeping over at Sunley House. Meanwhile, his workplace rival, a younger man called Rycroft, is also trying to find a buyer for Sunley House (and thereby usurp George’s place in the firm). One morning George finds himself locked in and has to crash through a window to escape. When Rycroft finds the broken window, he sets out to find the culprit. Read More »

Karel Reisz – Morgan: A Suitable Case for Treatment (1966)

Quote:
From Karel Reisz, the renowned director of Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, Night Must Fall, Isadora, The Gambler, Who’ll Stop the Rain, The French Lieutenant’s Woman and Sweet Dreams, comes this cult classic starring screen great Vanessa Redgrave (Julia, Mary, Queen of Scots) and legendary character actor David Warner (Cross of Iron, Perfect Friday) in one of his few starring roles. A gorilla-fixated artist with distinctly anarchist tendencies, Morgan (Warner) tries to regain the affections of his divorced wife Leonie (Redgrave) by variously kidnapping her, attempting to blow up her future mother-in-law and attacking her fiancé (Robert Stephens, Sherlock Holmes of Billy Wilder’s The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes). Cut with scenes from King Kong and Tarzan films, Morgan’s depiction of madness, dark humor and vintage performances made it one of the wildest, funniest and most provocative comedies of the ’60s. Nominated for two Oscars: Best Actress in a Leading Role (Redgrave) and Best Costume Design, Black-and-White (Jocelyn Rickards). Read More »