Tag Archives: Shirley Knight

Anthony Harvey – Dutchman (1967)

SYNOPSIS: “Harvey’s transition from editor to director is a brilliantly spare, edgy adaptation of LeRoi Jones’ play, basically a two-hander set on a New York subway train: a grim duel between cat and mouse as a rangily sexy white woman (Shirley Knight) circles a young black (Al Freeman Jr.) sitting alone, deliberately teasing, taunting, flaunting herself in a perverse attempt to break his control. Resentment and attraction crackle through the dialogue (and the superb performances) in an almost orgiastic expression of provocation and desire, until she wins and the black is goaded into retaliation. It ends, of course, in violence: a devastating acknowledgment that this is just about the only ground on which black and white can meet. The film’s one minor flaw is when the camera eventually pulls back from the duo to reveal that the carriage has filled with commuters studiously minding their own business; true to life, perhaps, but it comes over as a facile trick.” Read More »

William A. Graham – 21 Hours at Munich (1976)

21 Hours at Munich (1976)

A dramatization of the incident in 1972 when Arab terrorists broke into the Olympic compound in Munich and murdered eleven Israeli athletes. Read More »

Francis Ford Coppola – The Rain People (1969)

Quote:
Carefully observed and beautifully shot, the film that launched American Zoetrope 40 years ago is an early herald of Coppola’s talent for crafting delicate narratives that actors can sink their teeth into. Natalie (Shirley Knight) is a Long Island housewife trapped in a loveless marriage and stifled by domesticity. Two months pregnant and unable to bear her humdrum existence, she hits the road on a quest for freedom that Roger Ebert dubbed the “mirror image” of Easy Rider. Read More »