Tag Archives: Slovenian

Matjaz Klopcic – Moj ata, socialisticni kulak AKA My Dad, the Socialist Kulak (1987)

Year 1945. The second World War is over and the soldiers from the sisbanded army are returning home. Yet there is still no sign of Joze Malek. His wife Mimika and their children Tincek and olga know only that he had deserted the German army and gone over to the Soviet Red Army. Mimika works a a hired hand for the farmer, Medved, who givesher bread and milk for her child instead of regular wages. This is not at all to the liking of her relative Vanc. One fine day, father Malek comes home and the family is happilly reunited. Vanc tells Jozeabout the agrarian reform, through which the Maleks even get their own plot of land. In exchange of this, they have to remove all the religious symbols from their home. Read More »

Janez Lapajne – Selestenje AKA Rustling Landscapes (2002)

Quote:
Selestenje Selestenje (2002) Luka leaves for the countryside unhappy with the way his girlfriend Katarina has treated him. She follows him hoping that they could sort out their relationship. Despite the beauty and tranquillity of their surroundings they go through twists and turns that only intensify their crisis. When Katarina befriends the happy-go-lucky soldier Primoz, new dimensions and choices open up for her. Ultimately all three must decide where their own life will take them.

A quiet triumph of focused improvisation. Under Lapajne’s sure hand, universally understood issues of communication, fidelity, jealousy, longing and frustration are presented clearly and without manipulative sentiment, allowing the fundamental decency of the characters to shine through. Read More »

Bostjan Hladnik – Ubij me nežno aka Kill Me Softly (1979)

Boštjan Hladnik (30 January 1929 – 30 May 2006) was a Yugoslav/Slovene filmmaker.

Hladnik was born in Kranj. He started with amateur short films after acquiring a projector and a 8mm camera in 1947[1]. From 1949 he studied at the Academy for Theatre, Radio, Film and Television in Ljubljana and made a name for himself with several highly acclaimed short films. In 1957, Hladnik moved to Paris to apprentice under French filmmakers such as Claude Chabrol, Philipe de Broca, and Robert Siodmak. Hladnik’s early-’60s features, Ples v dežju (Dance in the Rain)[2] (1961) and Peščeni grad/Sand Castle[3] (1962), influenced the course of Yugoslav cinema, through integrating influences from the nouvelle vague into it. Read More »

Matjaz Ivanisin – Oroslan (2019)

When a man known as Oroslan dies, the news quickly spreads through a little village, causing grief and emotion. Later on, actions become words and words become stories. In order to overcome the sorrow and restore the natural flow of life, the villagers start sharing their memories about Oroslan, re-creating his image through their tales. Read More »

Matjaz Klopcic – Zgodba ki je ni (1967)

The feeling of being incapable of controlling your own life and general uselessness make people want to escape the world around them. In spite of the feeling that they possess some creative force, they still feel they waste their time and lives. Read More »

France Stiglic – Dolina miru AKA Valley of Peace (1956)

A boy and a rather younger girl lost their families in an air raid. They have heard about a valley where there is always peace and fancy that this is the house of the boy’s uncle. They start wandering for the valley. At the same time an airplane is shot down and the black American pilot jumped by parachute. He finds the children at a ford. There is absolutely no danger. But the girl is standing in the middle of the river, scared and crying and neither daring to go forth or back. The pilot cannot abandon the children although they will reduce his chance of escaping. Both the Germans and the partisans know that the pilot had survived. Who will find him first? Several things happen in rapid succession. The children and the pilot find the uncle’s house, which had since a long time been abandoned. The Germans arrive and catch the pilot. The partisans attack and liberate the pilot, who joins them. But during the fight he is soon deadly wounded and orders the children to run away…. Read More »

Marko Nabersnik – Sanghaj AKA Shanghai Gypsy (2012)

Synopsis:
Lutvija Belmondo Mirga narrates a story about four generations. Belmondo is the central character of the film, a gypsy king, who decided to establish his own gypsy village. He names it Shanghai. Belmondo makes a living smuggling and his power and influence grow big. He even gets the local police and politics on his side and that helps him to become untouchable for law. But with the downfall of Yugoslavia, smuggling of goods is replaced by smuggling of the arms. Though lucrative the business starts to threaten Belmondo’s personal life and he finds himself at the crossroads. Will he protect his own family or is he going to sacrifice his personal happiness for business ambitions? Shanghai Gypsy is a story about longing for happiness; it is a story about love and family ties, in which tears are intertwined with laughs. The story is set in times of the downfall of Yugoslavia. The film is shot in the authentic Romani language. Read More »