Tag Archives: Spanish

Fernando Pérez – José Martí: el ojo del canario AKA Martí, the Eye of the Canary (2010)

This historical drama, depicting different phases in the late childhood and youth of the so-called “Apostle of Cuba” José Martí, is most of the time a biopic full of commonplaces often found in this genre, directed by Fernando Pérez, one of the most respected names in Cuban cinema.

Narrated in four movements, in the first two (“Bees” and “Arias”), the 9 year old Martí (endearingly played by Damián Rodríguez) is bullied in school by schoolmates and abused by his schoolmaster, while he learns notions of justice and oppression from his father. He discovers the beauties of Mother Nature with an old slave, explores his sexuality and enters into the world of high art in a Havanan theater. The boy also becomes aware of the high price a poor child has to pay for education. Read More »

Rafael Gil – Don Quijote de la Mancha (1947)

Quote:
The first sound film version in Spanish of the great classic novel by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. A huge undertaking for Spanish cinema in its day, it was the longest film version of the novel up to that time, and very likely the most faithful, reverently following the book in its dialogue and order of episodes. Read More »

Álvaro Brechner – Mal día para pescar AKA Bad Day to Go Fishing (2009)

Quote:
A flamboyant impresario and an ageing ex-wrestling champion arrive in a small town, offering a hefty award to the local challenger. In fact, the promoter wants to rinse the spectators for every penny. But, is this a good day to go fishing? Read More »

Carlos Saura – La Caza AKA The Hunt (1966)

Quote:
Museo Valenciano de la Ilustración y la Modernidad writes:
José, Paco and Luis, three middle-aged men who fought in the “national” side during the Spanish Civil War, meet in a village of Castilla to hunt rabbits, accompanied by young Enrique. But the hunting journey will stir up deep latent frustrations and rancours within the group. La Caza, which won the Silver Bear for the Best director in Berlin, was compared by critics with the most avant-garde films of that period. It had a remarkable influence on directors such as Sam Peckinpah, who found in this film a source of stylistic and thematic inspiration. Read More »

Armando Bo – El trueno entre las hojas AKA Thunder Among the Leaves (1956)

A true Argentine cult classic. The first movie starring Isabel “La Coca” Sarli, featuring the first full frontal nude of Argentine cinema. Armando Bo and Isabel Sarli would later have a long lasting relationship and collaborate in almost 30 movies along 25 years.

El trueno entre las hojas is based on a Augusto Roa Bastos’ tale. At a sawmill where labourers are inhumanly exploited, the arrival of the landlord’s young and beautiful wife makes years of rising tensions finally unleash a worker’s revolt. Read More »

Gaspar Antillo – Nadie Sabe Que Estoy Aquí AKA Nobody Knows I’m Here (2020)

Quote:
“Nobody Knows I’m Here” tells the story of Memo (Jorge Garcia), a recluse hiding out with his uncle Braulio (Luis Gnecco) in a remote part of Chile. Memo likes breaking into people’s houses for reasons unexplained, and would appear to be on the autism spectrum though a line of dialogue negates that. He helps his uncle tend sheep while refusing any attempt to attend public events or be sociable. He barely even speaks to Braulio, who chides him about his anti-social behavior and penchant for breaking and entering. At night, Memo occasionally dresses in the flashy outfits he makes and performs for an audience of one. Read More »

Pedro Aguilera – Naufragio aka Wreckage (2010)

http://img62.imageshack.us/img62/4421/naufragioresize.jpg

Quote:

Illegal immigration is one of the most challenging problems facing Spain over these
last few years. From among the thousands of immigrants entering the country by
various means, there are hundreds and hundreds trying to reach Spanish territory on
rudimentary open-decked vessels, most of them setting out from along the African
coast. Many of these African immigrants fail to reach Spain and find their death in the
sea. Read More »