Tag Archives: Stanislav Lyubshin

Marlen Khutsiev – Mne dvadtsat let aka I Am Twenty (1965) (HD)

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This movie was originally filmed in 1962 as Zastava Ilyicha (The Ilyich Gate). It was one of the first films that reflected the younger generation’s resentment of the older generation’s ways. The original title referred to Lenin’s paternal name (his full name was Vladimir Ilyich Lenin). Even after the decanonization of Stalin, Lenin still remained the icon for the old generation. “Ilyich” was often used as an affectionate term in Soviet iconography. The film invoked Soviet premier Nikita Khruschev’s sharp criticism. Meeting the studio members, he said: “Do you want us to believe in the scene where a father doesn’t know how to answer his son’s question “how to live?” At the censor’s insistence the movie was re-cut and released under the “apolitical” title Mne Dvatdsat Let (I’m Twenty) in 1964. In 1991, the film was re-released and shown at the London Film Festival with ninety minutes of the original footage restored, resulting in a film which was 175 minutes long. Read More »

Nikita Mikhalkov – Pyat vecherov aka Five Evenings (1979)

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Based on the play by Alexander Volodin. The set is the 1950s. The tangible world of an old communal apartment is recreated onscreen with an incredible accuracy, every thing capturing the flair of the time. The stylized visuals, the curious objects, the amusing inhabitants, so charming and exotic… There are all the marks of the ‘retro’ style, which is always ‘in’. The actors Ludmila Gurchenko and Stanislav Lyubshin succeeded in conveying everything that they couldn’t say openly. The finale allows for different interpretations. Hence the emotions evoked by this impeccably made melodrama appear to be even more poignant.Once Alexander and Tamara were in love. But the war had separated them… Twenty long years after, they meet again, but they lack the courage to admit that their feelings are still alive. Unable to overcome their pride, they try to convince each other that both are doing just fine…
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