Turkish

  • Lütfi Akad – Düğün AKA The Wedding (1973)

    The Wedding, which is the second part of Akad’s trilogy, depicts the struggles of a migrant Anatolian family to adapt to and survive in the very different conditions of urban Istanbul, is one of the best presentations of internal migration in Turkish cinema. Akad uses the experiences of a provincial family as his medium for drawing attention to a period of disintegrating feudal relationships and burgeoning proletarianism. And this strikes the kind of political chord that is rarely encountered now in Turkish cinema; an approach that is borne out by the film’s ‘happy ending’. The Wedding is profoundly impressive as a film that explores and comments on the painful period of change sweeping Turkey at the time, but also for its standpoint, a combination of social realism and socialist reality.Read More »

  • Atif Yilmaz – Aaahh Belinda (1986)

    Synopsis
    Serap, a young actress with a strong, lively personality and a special dislike for middle-class family life, takes part in a TV-commercial for a recently marketed shampoo, “Belinda”. She plays the role of a typical housewife called Naciye.Read More »

  • Lütfi Akad – Diyet (1974)

    Quote:
    Lütfi Akad completes with Diyet (Blood Money) his trilogy based on internal migration. Diyet depicts the struggles of a migrant Anatolian family to adapt to and survive in the very different conditions of urban Istanbul. Akad uses the experiences of a provincial family as his medium for drawing attention to a period of disintegrating feudal relationships and burgeoning proletarianism. And this strikes the kind of political chord that is rarely encountered now in Turkish cinema.Read More »

  • Lutfi Akad – Gelin AKA Bride (1973)

    Quote:
    The Bride, which depicts the struggles of a migrant Anatolian family to adapt to and survive in the very different conditions of urban Istanbul, is one of the best presentations of internal migration in Turkish cinema. It is also the first, and most accomplished film in Ömer Lütfi Akad’s celebrated trilogy, which with The Wedding (Dügün, 1973) and Blood Money (Diyet) has earned a respected place in world cinema for its thematic unity. The Bride masterfully exposes the evolution of ‘little Anatolia’ in Istanbul, a phenomenon that would go on to acquire far larger dimensions.Read More »

  • Bruno Corbucci – Hamama Giden Terler AKA Trouble in Istamboel [TV Version] (1974)

    IMDB:
    Italian singer and actor Don Backy and b-movie icon George Eastman unite together for a comedy full of action, witty and – punches.Read More »

  • Zeki Ökten – Kapicilar krali AKA The King of Porters (1976)

    As a tragicomic representation of the sudden transformation of Turkey’s social structure in the 1970s, The King of Porters is among the most memorable films in the history of Turkish cinema.

    Seemingly naïve but in fact cunning and crafty Seyit works as a concierge in an apartment building in Istanbul. He lives with his wife who works as a cleaning lady and their two kids. The building houses all types of people from alcoholics to usurers, from retired army officers to public servants. It takes him a couple of fraudulent tricks to strike it rich. Soon the porter turns things to his advantage and secures his place, by finding out about everything going on in the building, and gradually wrapping all the residents around his finger. When he buys more than half of the building the residents’ contempt for him is magically transformed into respect.Read More »

  • Tayfun Pirselimoglu – Hiçbiryerde AKA In Nowhere Land (2002)

    In Turkey, more than a thousand people go missing “normally” every year and only half can be found. Some of these people go missing while in police custody.

    Dedicated to his mother and to all mothers, writer-director Tayfun Pirselimoðlu’s fictional Hiçbiryerde follows a mother’s search for her missing son. When she is asked whether her son was involved in politics, Sükran answers, “Certainly not.” After losing her husband, a political prisoner, Sükran had determined to keep hold of her son, Veysel; but the boy, after all, was also his father’s son.Read More »

  • Mustafa Altioklar – Asansör AKA Elevator (1999)

    Plot
    The images reflected on the screen come from a camera that Namik is carrying, a camera that is forgotten. The young man running in a hospital corridor is looking for his wife, Nurcan, who is a nurse. He finds her and takes the trigger of his gun. And then he decides on his own life and all this is recorded in the camera. Can goes to an address he never met to meet a woman he met on the internet and would see for the first time in the physical environment. The apartment is an old, renovated and abandoned look. Can is in the elevator. When the 4th floor comes, the elevator stops. As the interior doors slammer and make noise, the cabin falls half a meter down. When you are shouting in the panic, the door to the apartment opposite the cabin opens. A woman is seen. From this moment on, the 4-day slavery in Can’s cabin begins.Read More »

  • Oguzhan Tercan – Hirsiz var! AKA Robbery Alla Turca (2005)

    Quote:
    With the death of a billionaire engaged in illegal practices, his billion-dollar fortune is up for the grabs. As his art collection is being prepared to be sold at an auction, two Turkish thieves from Germany are hired to steal valuable paintings from the art collection. Meanwhile, Seckin the fashioner designer – also the brother of Binnur, wife of the late billionaire – prepares for a fashion show in the same hotel that the robbery is going to take place. With the intervention of police, the beautiful model and her ex-lover, a hip papparazi, the two “Laz” mafia bosses seeking revenge, and the getaway driver straight out of Selcuk Erdem caricatures, the robbery is bound to go wrong. Prepare for a twist at the end as the plot unfolds towards a climactic ending…Read More »

Back to top button