Tag Archives: Walter Abel

George Nichols Jr. – Portia on Trial (1937)

Lady lawyer Portia Merryman (Frieda Inescourt) defends woebegone Elizabeth Manners (Heather Angel), who is on trial for shooting her lover Earle Condon (Neil Hamilton). Ironically, Portia herself had once had an affair with Earle’s father, powerful publisher John Condon (Clarence Kolb). She has a pretty good idea of what is going on in Elizabeth’s head, since she herself was on the verge of killing Condon when he ruthlessly took custody of her illegitimate son (not Earle, though that certainly would have brought things full circle). As Portia toils and strains to free her client, she carries on a romance with Dan Foster (Walter Abel) — the attorney for the prosecution. LA Law and The Practice have nothing on this one! Read More »

Walter Doniger – The Steel Jungle (1956)

Quote:
Ed Novak, a two-bit bookie, goes to prison rather than squeal on his Syndicate higher-ups. Novak’s silence exacts a toll on his wife Frances, who is expecting a child. The longer Novak remains in prison, the more he becomes aware that the mob has deserted him — and the more he’s willing to spill what he knows. Fellow prisoner Steve Marlin intends to see that Novak keeps his mouth shut permanently. Read More »

King Vidor – An American Romance (1944)

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Plot:
Brian Donlevy goes from rags to riches in King Vidor’s ambitious Technicolor ode to hard work, family and the American Dream. Arriving penniless in the United States, Czech immigrant Steve Dangos (Donlevy) soon realizes America truly is the land of opportunity. Starting out in the iron mines of Minnesota, Dangos heads to the steel mills of Chicago, a decision that will earn him wealth and power beyond his wildest dreams – and put him at odds with his workers when they try to unionize. Produced over a two-year period at the then-enormous sum of $3 million, An American Romance is a bold and gripping saga in the Vidor tradition. “No other American director ever matched Vidor’s sense of personal struggle, or the muscular poetry he found to express it” (Tony Rayns, Time Out Film Guide). From Warner Brothers! Read More »