Tag Archives: Xuejian Li

Zhuangzhuang Tian – Te bie shou shu shi AKA Unforgettable Life (1988)

Lu Yun, an anchor of a television program, becomes pregnant before marriage but decides to have an induced abortion. After this induced abortion experience, she realizes the social problem of pregnancy before marriage and makes up her mind to carry out a special topic report in the hospital. In this movie, Chinese female’s attitude towards sex and the state of the sex education, sexual harassment in the office, incest happening between fathers and daughters, ultra-marriage love affairs, especially the harm done to the female who is pregnant before marriage are directly revealed. Read More »

Yimou Zhang – Shan zha shu zhi lian aka Under the Hawthorn Tree (2010)

Plot:
Romance sparks between a young woman and a young man from different economic backgrounds during China’s Cultural Revolution of the 1960s and ’70s.
Zhang Yimou’s highly anticipated film, which is adapted from a popular novel of the same name from Ai Mi, harkens back to the innocence of the 1970’s in presenting this pure and moving tear jerking love story, set in 1975 in a small village in Yichang City, Hubei Province. The story is of an unfulfilled romance between Jingqiu and a young man named Laosan during their “zhiqing” days towards the end of the Cultural Revolution (1966-76). Zhiqing refers to young urbanites who were sent to the countryside during that turbulent decade. Jingqiu, who had had a difficult life after her father was labeled a right-winger, met the handsome Laosan, who had a promising future because of his high-ranking military officer father. The couple fall in love, despite the gulf between their backgrounds. The only question remains is if their romance ever become fulfilled. Read More »

Shaohong Li – Sishi puhuo AKA Family Portrait (1992)

After laying bare backward village mentalities in Bloody Morning, Li Shaohong turns her attention to China’s urban middle class. Cao is a photographer, married to an opera singer and with an infant son, caught in the usual professional morass of political compromise. His life starts to fall apart when he learns that his ex-wife also bore him a son some months after their divorce – and when the boy turns up looking for his father. Nothing wildly dramatic, just believable people in believable situations. If the ending seems a touch forced, this is nevertheless a sign that ‘Fifth Generation’ cinema is changing and coming to terms with up-to-date realities. Read More »