Tag Archives: Yaphet Kotto

Hal Barwood – Warning Sign (1985)

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A woman working as a security guard in an agricultural research facility finds herself and her co-worker Schmidt fighting to survive against their former friends. Read More »

Stuart Rosenberg – Brubaker (1980)

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When Brubaker (Robert Redford) comes to a small state prison to be its new warden, he’s horrified by what he sees. Prisoners are sold as slaves, and even decent food can’t be obtained without cold, hard cash. So the enraged warden tries to set matters right…but the more he reforms, the more enemies he makes with the townspeople who have benefitted from the corruption. Soon Brubaker’s in big trouble–and it looks as if no one is powerful enough to help. This powerful drama received an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Screenplay. Read More »

Arthur Marks – Friday Foster (1975)

A woman looking for adventure finds romance, excitement and danger in her viewfinder in this action-packed comedy-drama. Friday Foster (Pam Grier) is a beautiful and ambitious young photographer who is working as an assistant at Glance Magazine, edited by the hard-boiled Monk Riley (Julius Harris). When Riley can’t get in touch with his first-call photographer, he calls Foster with a very important New Year’s Eve assignment — reclusive billionaire Blake Tarr (Thalmus Rasulala), often called “the black Howard Hughes,” is expected to be coming to Los Angeles, and Riley wants pictures of Tarr’s arrival. Read More »

Paul Schrader – Blue Collar (1978)

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Paul Schrader’s directorial debut examines the trials of Detroit autoworkers living at the mercy of a heartless corporation and a corrupt union. Surviving from paycheck to paycheck, Checker Cab assembly linemen Zeke (Richard Pryor), Jerry (Harvey Keitel), and Smokey (Yaphet Kotto) scrape by and take pleasure in a few rounds of beer or bowling (and occasional illicit amusements). But when their money troubles pile up, Jerry and Smokey join Zeke in a desperate plan to steal cash from their local union office. Along with a piddling $600, they unexpectedly swipe evidence of union corruption. Read More »